Silk Glazing Yarn

Silk Glazing Yarn

I am cross posting this from my other blog on www.fiberygoodness.com, because I have also just added this video tutorial into the Tutorials gallery here on my Woolwench site 🙂 There is  a bit of background:   Silk hankies, what to do with them?! This was a question I was asking myself back in 2013 when I first started wrapping textured yarns up in silk. My first experiments involved some eyelash yarn and a coil, you can read about it on the Majacraft blog, it was all started with a dream about cobwebs 🙂 “https://www.majacraft.co.nz/?p=516  Since then I have continued to play around with materials and techniques to refine the process and see what else I could do with it. I did some ‘wrapping and trapping’, adding in felted nepps inside the layer of silk, this was fun and successful and looked great in a weaving. Silk is such a strong and grippy thread that it has a very wide range of versatility, and of course the colour potential and sheen always adds a zing to any yarn it is added in to. Back then I did a very brief ‘this is how I did it’ video, so now I have consolidated the technique further i felt it was time to create a more comprehensive video showing you one way, the original way, to do it! I love to create a very architectural yarn as the base for silk glazing, because it creates a wonderful sculptural kind of texture for the glaze to adhere to. Of course, this is just one way, you should also feel free to experiment with things like: silk glazing your singles and then plying to integrate the silk inside the yarn instead of outside it, Silk Glazing lockspun yarns, adding a light glaze of the same colour around any kind of yarn (the silk enhances the colour tremendously). So with no further ado – here is my latest video tutorial: WoolWench Silk Glazing! I hope you enjoy it and give it a go!...

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What is ‘Art’ about ‘Art Yarn’?

What is ‘Art’ about ‘Art Yarn’?

What makes a yarn creation ‘art’ rather than ‘craft’? Is craft art? Is art crafted? I could go in circles over this for quite a while! But it IS something I have put a lot of thought into over recent years, and it stems partly from the age old debate about ‘what is art’. Traditionally, spinners have been considered craftspeople, we have learned skills, techniques, and knowledge that has been gathered over years and honed into something we can turn into beautifully crafted yarns. Often what we craft as spinners is the key ingredient in something that IS made as ‘art’ – tapestries, weavings, art installations.. However, to my thinking, there is also a time when we can call our handspun yarns ‘art’, I think there is a threshold we cross that moves what we spin from being a ‘craft’ product right into the realm of being ‘art’ in and of itself. I think it needs a few specific elements to take it beyond the skilful activity of crafting and into the expressive activity of making art. And it is of course as always, in the eye of the beholder, or rather for us, in the intention with which we create. I have an idea about the specific elements I believe ‘art yarn’ needs to have in order to be called art (and remember I view this as being is different from ‘textured’ yarns,’themed’ yarns, ‘intuitive yarns’ or even ‘no rules’ yarns). What follows is an overview of the approach I have worked on developing and solidifying over some years of spinning, from teaching art yarn workshops around the world, and as a result of my experience in co-creating and running the Journey to the Golden Fleece Creativity course (plus others) for Fiber artists at Fiberygoodness.com. I want to share this approach because inside it I have found some specific methods for taking abstract ideas, feelings, and notions and turning them into concrete, tangible expressions = art. I hope this is a useful approach for anyone wondering how to take their spinning beyond the craft and into something that reflects who they are and what is important to them, beyond making something wonderful to knit with and into making something that is unique, distinctively ‘you’, and that expresses something important to you. My Woolwenchy approach to spinning art yarns: This is a threefold approach that includes concept (inspiration), design (construction), and technique (execution). Concept The yarn you are spinning is not just for the sake of spinning, for this yarn you are wanting to express an idea, a theme, or a concept in your yarn. To do this, you want to fill your yarn with elements that reflect your theme (ie an architectural theme...

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